OnPoint, LLC

Life in the fast lane

You see them on the freeway, driving in the left lane, 5 feet behind the next car, staring at their cell phones and eating breakfast.  Their driving style limits their ability respond to changes in road conditions or to react to the actions of other drivers. They take an excessive amount of risk in order to save a couple of minutes. There is a good chance that, if they make it to the office safely, their driving style will carry over into their work.

Excessive speed is standard operating procedure in business today.  Staff levels have been cut but workloads have not, leaving no resources to maneuver around obstacles and pursue new opportunities.  There is an excess of activity and a shortage of results. As the Eagles (the band, not the football team) would say, life in the fast last will “surely make you lose your mind.”  Is it time to back off the throttle? Following are a few thoughts how to slow down and still improve performance.

  • Challenge the thinking behind deadlines. Is there a business need for to hit this particular date? Or is the date merely a means to create a sense of urgency?
  • Adjust your project portfolio to make sure it is complete and matches your capacity. It is common for people to work on projects that have not yet been identified, approved and prioritized. Even if they are working on approved projects, the sequence of those projects may result in bottlenecks while awaiting the availability of key subject matter experts. Try to stagger project start dates to minimize the risk of colliding priorities.
  • End a project and declare victory. When employing an agile project approach, business value is delivered incrementally according to priorities set by the business owner. After a point, the incremental business value for a given project may be lower than that of a competing project. You do not need to complete every deliverable on the backlog list. Take a look at the entire portfolio of projects and identify those that can be considered complete, then close them out and free up the resources for other work.

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OnPoint, LLC