OnPoint, LLC

Beware of Assumptions – They May Bite

Those of us who work with projects are always making assumptions.  We think about them briefly when writing the project charter, and they seem so reasonable at the time.  Certainly the customers will use the new product and will tell all their friends about it.  And there is no question that we will get our product to market faster than our competitors – even those competitors that are not currently on our radar.  So, we spend the next 3 months, 6 months or more working on the release only to find that our assumptions have bitten us in the … leg and make us look foolish. 

The agile frame work, with the reliance on the judgment of product owners, may help prove or disprove the assumptions before we launch the new product.  But product owners are proxies for the real customers in the market and may make incorrect assumptions about priorities and product features.   The customers are the ones who are most able to either prove or disprove our assumptions, but how do we engage them?

Eric Ries, who wrote the book, The Lean Start Up, proposes a systematic management process that calls for validating product strategy assumptions via the development of a “minimum viable product (MVP)” that can be used by potential customers very early in the product development process.  The metrics resulting from the use of the MVP provides input into decisions to either “pivot or persevere” with the original product strategy.  Here is a link to a website that discusses the book, the process, and the movement in support of lean product development http://theleanstartup.com.

If you are contemplating a new product or service and would prefer not to be bitten in your assumptions, it would be worthwhile to investigate the lean start up process.

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